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Conf/CfP - Istanbul Human Security Conference, 18-20 October 2017, Turkey


Deadline:

June 20, 2017

Disciplines:


Opportunity Cover Image - Conf/CfP - Istanbul Human Security Conference, 18-20 October 2017, Turkey

Call for Papers

The seventh annual Istanbul Human Security Conference will take place on the 18-20 October 2017. The conference is a close collaboration between the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations at Coventry University, the United Nations Human Security Unit, and Kadir Has University, and it will be hosted in Kadir Has University in Istanbul. This year’s conference is entitled ‘Human Security in Difficult Times’. In recent years a number of developments have arisen that pose a challenge to the human security agenda, both for academics and practitioners. The resurgence in populism, mass internal displacement and refugee flows, the ongoing durability of many non-state armed groups, and a squeezing of civil society, are just some of the significant issues that can be observed around the world today. This conference will explore how these issues are impacting the concept and practice of human security. We wish to consider whether the difficult times we are witnessing offer an opportunity to reaffirm the importance of a human security approach or whether we are moving further away from the ability of human security approaches to shape the agenda. We hope to bring fresh insights and to lead new thinking around the role and future of human security today. This conference will look at human security in difficult times under the follow headings (but we also welcome additional relevant themes and suggestions): In a time of populism – how has the recent rise of populist leaders and parties in all regions of the world, and the traditional nationalist values they often promote, impacted the human security agenda? Does the rejection of cosmopolitanism that populism entails

This year’s conference is entitled ‘Human Security in Difficult Times’. In recent years a number of developments have arisen that pose a challenge to the human security agenda, both for academics and practitioners. The resurgence in populism, mass internal displacement and refugee flows, the ongoing durability of many non-state armed groups, and a squeezing of civil society, are just some of the significant issues that can be observed around the world today. This conference will explore how these issues are impacting the concept and practice of human security. We wish to consider whether the difficult times we are witnessing offer an opportunity to reaffirm the importance of a human security approach or whether we are moving further away from the ability of human security approaches to shape the agenda. We hope to bring fresh insights and to lead new thinking around the role and future of human security today. This conference will look at human security in difficult times under the follow headings (but we also welcome additional relevant themes and suggestions): In a time of populism – how has the recent rise of populist leaders and parties in all regions of the world, and the traditional nationalist values they often promote, impacted the human security agenda? Does the rejection of cosmopolitanism that populism entails

This conference will explore how these issues are impacting the concept and practice of human security. We wish to consider whether the difficult times we are witnessing offer an opportunity to reaffirm the importance of a human security approach or whether we are moving further away from the ability of human security approaches to shape the agenda. We hope to bring fresh insights and to lead new thinking around the role and future of human security today. This conference will look at human security in difficult times under the follow headings (but we also welcome additional relevant themes and suggestions): In a time of populism – how has the recent rise of populist leaders and parties in all regions of the world, and the traditional nationalist values they often promote, impacted the human security agenda? Does the rejection of cosmopolitanism that populism entails mean that a security policy focused on freedoms and rights is all but impossible or does this make human security more important than ever? In a time of isolationism – liberal interventionism was often (rightly or wrongly) justified from a human security perspective, but today Western powers are reluctant to intervene in conflicts abroad. Is this a promising development given the poor history of intervention or is this to be regretted? Where does this leave the doctrine of responsibility to protect today? In a time of the world on the move – mass displacement and refugee flows have

Is this a promising development given the poor history of intervention or is this to be regretted? Where does this leave the doctrine of responsibility to protect today? In a time of the world on the move – mass displacement and refugee flows have characterised recent years, with the Syrian civil war in particular having an impact upon the entire Middle East and the EU. What have been the implications of large flows of people for individual governments, international organizations and local groups, and why has an adequate policy response been so difficult to find? In a time of non-state armed groups – the post-Cold War era saw an unprecedented number of peace processes around the world, but a number of armed groups remain active today. For every successful demobilization like FARC, there are groups that have reverted back to violence (for example in Burundi), new armed groups have emerged (most notably, ISIS), while many others remain entrenched in their violent struggles (such as the PKK and the Taliban). What is and what should be the role of human security in working to transform violent non-state armed groups? In a time of civil society under pressure – civil society is under siege from a number of threats today, including encroachments from

In a time of civil society under pressure – civil society is under siege from a number of threats today, including encroachments from government, economic austerity, and public apathy. Given the centrality of a vibrant civil society to human security, how does this impact the human security agenda and what is the relationship between human security and civil society? In a time of freedom to live in dignity – freedom of dignity and the right to meaningful participation in a community are often overlooked in predominant security practices. Dignity seems harder than ever to sustain for populations who experience conflict. How should policy makers ensure the right to dignity, what form should this take, and what is the importance of dignity for an individual’s identity?

Submission of Proposals

There are three ways to apply to the conference, either as an individual paper, as a panel or as a roundtable discussion.

1. If you would like to submit an individual paper proposal, you must to submit a 200 word abstract.

2. If you would like to propose a panel you should send a 200 word abstract with details of the theme of the panel, the names of the proposed presenters and titles of their papers, and a chair of the session. Panel sessions will last 90 minutes and should contain three to four papers.

3. We will hold a small number of roundtable sessions where a group of two to three experts will have a discussion led by a chair about a theme of particular importance. This will include an opportunity for the audience to ask questions and to engage with leading experts in a more informal setting. If you would like to propose a roundtable discussion, you should submit a 200 word abstract outlining the debate you will have and why it is important, as well as two to three proposed experts and a possible chair

An important aspect of this conference is encouraging a dialogue between academics and practitioners, so we welcome submissions from both these groups.

Important Dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts is 20th June 2017

Successful authors will be notified by 20th July 2017

Deadline for registration is 20th August 2017

Should you have any questions about this call, please email Matthew.Whiting@coventry.ac.uk

For more information please click "Further Official Information" below.


Eligible Countries
Host Country
Conference Type
Publish Date
May 19, 2017




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